Finding Inspiration in Steve Jobs and The Beatles at ACEDC

By Robin Fitzpatrick

ACEDC’s projects have a lot in common with The Beatles. Yes, you read that right. And it’s all summarized in a quote from the late great Apple CEO Steve Jobs:

“My model for business is The Beatles. They balanced each other, and the total was greater than the sum of their parts. That’s how I see business: great things in business are never done by one person; they’re done by a team of people.”

ACEDC is also part of a band, so to speak—an extensive team of nonprofit service providers—and I want to shed some light on these incredible relationships. Just as each musician in a band plays his/her instrument and contributes to the song, ACEDC partners with other agencies and businesses throughout Adams County and all of Central PA to accomplish success for Adams County businesses. One of the most amazing benefits about our nonprofit network of providers? Nearly all services are available to area business owners at no cost… free!

Let’s say someone walks in our door and wants to find out how we can help them attain financing to start a business. First, we access where they are in the process. We can refer them to commercial lenders, accountants, attorneys, and help them assemble a professional team. But more often than not, our first referral is to the Small Business Development Center (SBDC) at Shippensburg University which offers free, confidential consulting services to entrepreneurs.

Cheryl Young
Cheryl Young

“Preparation is a big part of starting a business,” explains Cheryl Young of the SBDC. “The most important aspect is whether they have enough capital to finance a business. They have to research how much money is needed to launch the business and sustain it through the first two years. Also, do they have management capabilities? We help them do market research as well. There are a lot of avenues, a lot of information that we work with the client on—we help them realize what they’re getting into.”

Young helps referrals develop business plans and research their markets. A potential business owner, armed with valuable data, is then prepared to come back to ACEDC and explore financing options. That’s where more team members come into play—within state agencies to apply for low-interest loans, for example, or commercial lenders.

Jill Bollinger
Jill Bollinger

One very unique lender is Jill Bollinger, Vice President of Community Lending for York and Adams Counties, with Community First Fund based in York. Community First Fund, a nonprofit, provides loans and counseling to small and mid-size businesses.

“We are about impact—funding loans that have a true impact upon low wealth communities and individuals,” Bollinger explains. “I’ve always enjoyed small business lending and the consultative aspect. With Community First Fund, so much of my focus is consulting and bringing partners together. There’s no question, after working as a commercial lender for 30+ years, this is some of the most fulfilling work I’ve ever done and I love being part of a collaboration.”

Both agencies, the SBDC and Community First Fund, claim incredible statistics to back up their work.

According to the SBDC’s Director Mike Unruh, the center averages 350 clients annually, all acquired organically through word-of-mouth from partners such as ACEDC in a four-county region. In 2015, Shippensburg SBDC founded 44 new businesses, either created or saved 431 jobs, and secured almost $8 million dollars to start or grow businesses.

“But one of the things I find most interesting is a statistic from the statewide network of SBDCs,” Unruh says. “Of the folks who receive assistance from the SBDCs , eight in 10 are still in business eight years later—a much greater number than those who proceed without assistance. We provide an educational piece—what it means to start and manage a business—that makes a difference.”

Community First Fund covers a 13-county area. Since 1992, they have financed 1,436 business and community development projects, disbursing nearly $120 million, which created and retained more than 6,600 jobs. True to their mission, 80% of those loans were to people of color, and people/communities that qualified as low-income. Additionally 36% of the loans were made to women-owned businesses, 24% went to community service organizations, and 36% helped businesses launch. Many of these projects translated into restored downtown neighborhoods and sustainable community service programs.

This column focuses on just two of ACEDC’s numerous partners. Seeing the results is an extremely rewarding process. Steve Jobs was indeed right—“great things in business are never done by one person; they’re done by a team of people.”

Robin Fitzpatrick, President of ACEDC, can be reached at 717-334-0042, ext. 1. For additional information, see acedc.org, and follow the organization on Facebook and Twitter for the latest Adams County business news.

 

 

 

Collaborative Cold Storage Facility Expands to Support Adams County Fruitgrowing Industry

2014 Bream and Bear

Two family-owned and operated Adams County fruit growing companies, Bear Mountain Orchards and Bream Orchards, have expanded their cooperative cold storage facility via financing secured through the nonprofit Adams County Economic Development Corporation (ACEDC).

Bream and Bear Operating Company was founded in 2008; both parent companies have been in the fruit farming business since 1935. They joined forced to build a cold storage facility, beginning construction in 2009.

“ACEDC applauds the partnership between Bream and Bear, to creatively find a solution to the lack of fresh fruit storage in Adams County,” says Kaycee Kemper, Vice President of ACEDC. “Today, the expansion of their joint facility further enhances their ability to maximize the yields of their fresh fruit crops.”

“There is a gradual shift from growing processing apples (used in applesauce and juice) to producing fresh fruit, leading to a greater need for cold storage,” according to John Lott of Bear Mountain Orchards.

Lott says the facility’s initial construction, coupled with the new expansion, has made a positive impact on both fruit growing businesses. He adds that working with ACEDC has been “great.”

According to Kemper, the Pennsylvania Industrial Development Authority (PIDA) has invested $2.7 million between the two loans. These funds leveraged $5.6 million in private funding.

“With a project of this size, low rate-fixed financing is imperative for the borrower. ACEDC is happy to partner yet again with Bream and Bear to make this expansion a reality; the project further solidifies the relationship between economic development and the agricultural community,” Kemper states.

This project marks the 43nd loan facilitated by ACEDC to Adams County’s agricultural community since 1996. Previous loan projects, located throughout the entire county, supported projects that included cattle, orchards, chickens, crop production, eggs, turkeys, and wineries.  Agriculture is considered one of Adams County’s three main pillars of industry, sharing that distinction with tourism and manufacturing/industrial.

ACEDC is certified annually by DCED in order to process and administer loan and grant programs for Adams County’s businesses. ACEDC began administering loans to the agricultural and tourism industries during Governor Edward G. Rendell’s administration, 2003-2011, thanks to revised and restructured state policies.

Over the past nine years, ACEDC has helped Adams County businesses secure more than $26.5 million in total public investment via low-interest loans and grants from DCED and more than $74 million in total private investment via local commercial financing, creating 587 new jobs and retaining 1,520 jobs in Adams County.

ACEDC is a private, 501 (c)(6) not-for-profit organization incorporated in 1989 as a result of a task force initiated by Adams County business leaders. The corporation is governed by a board of director comprised of many local and regional community leaders from all sectors of industry. ACEDC’s mission is to improve the economy of Adams County while preserving and enhancing the quality of life by formulating, implementing and promoting economic development strategies for sustained investment and employment opportunities in Adams County. For more information, see acedc.org or call 717-334-0042.

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Meet Atapco Properties, Developers Behind the Lincoln Commons Project

AtapcoProperties

By Corrie Wade, Atapco Properties

 

Atapco Properties, a wholly owned subsidiary of American Trading and Production Corporation, is a full-service real estate development company active in Maryland, Delaware, Indiana, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Virginia. Our corporate mission is to develop state-of-the-art industrial, retail, residential and mixed-use projects with an emphasis on sustainability and green building standards.

Atapco is committed to developing quality smart-growth projects that bring vitality and lasting value to the areas we serve; greatly improving the quality of life for residents, tourists and the broader community. Through thoughtful site selection, planning and context-sensitive design principles, we are able to tailor each project to the specific needs of the community in ways that protect each area’s unique character and landscape while creating diverse developments that support unmet market demands, directly contribute to the local economy and improve the quality of life in the region.

Lincoln Commons, purchased by Atapco Properties in 2014, is one such example of this commitment to creating projects that provide lasting value. The 10.2-acre retail project, located at PA Route 30 and Shealer Road in Gettysburg, will feature pad-sites and a 19,200 square foot multi-tenant retail building, providing the area with a diverse mix of restaurants, retail and service providers—including a pharmacy, a bank and a Taco Bell restaurant. Atapco is excited to move forward with the long-awaited development of Lincoln Commons. The project will  build on the designated community growth area, create job opportunities, stimulate economic growth, increase the local tax base and provide public infrastructure improvements such as the widening of Shealer Road and the addition of a street light at Hull Drive.

The population of the Gettysburg metro area has seen recent significant growth, with an increase of over 11% from 2000 to 2014. As a “Presidential Investor” with the Adams County Economic Development Corporation, we understand the need to attract, retain and expand business opportunities to help support and serve the thriving area. We are delighted to bring Lincoln Commons to Gettysburg and provide residents with convenient retail, service and dining options while making a meaningful investment in the local economy.

This month’s ACEDC column is provided by Corrie Wade, Marketing Coordinator for Atapco Properties, as a benefit of Atapco’s Presidential Investment in ACEDC for 2016.

You are invited to partner with ACEDC as an investor to continue our county’s success! More than 50 investments by businesses, nonprofits and individuals, which include a host of benefits, are featured on the ACEDC website and social media sites. See the current listing at acedc.org under Investor Directory. ACEDC is grateful to Atapco Properties and all 2016 investors! Contact ACEDC’s Kaycee Kemper (717-334-0042, Kemper10@acedc.org) for more information and to become an investor today.

Learn more about Atapco Properties: Click here for their website

 

 

 

 

 

 

General Authority: A New Economic Development “Vehicle” for Adams County

0909-Aerial Adams Commerce Center jm-0777_1

Aerial photo, Adams Commerce Park

This article was originally published in the Gettysburg Times, June 9, 2016.

By Robin Fitzpatrick

There are now three avenues through which economic development—and bank qualified lending—can take place in Adams County. I like the word “avenue” because it describes a two-way flow, of traffic and conversation, that occurs during economic development projects. Similarly, Sam Wiser of Salzmann Hughes says, “There’s now an additional economic development vehicle in Adams County.” Whether you use the word vehicle or avenue, both words imply that Adams County is on the map and on the road to a brighter future!

The creation of the Adams County General Authority (GA) is the new avenue or vehicle that we’re talking about. Let’s take a look at how and why this entity came about.

ACEDC was founded in 1988 after the Batelle Study identified a need for formalized economic development in Adams County. Our mission was established—to assist businesses with their needs for lending, site selection, expansion, employment, etc.

Also in 1998, the ACEDC board requested that the County of Adams create an Industrial Development Authority (IDA) through which tax exempt financing could become an option for new and existing businesses, with a focus on manufacturing. This allowed the staff of the EDC to provide a full spectrum of economic development services.

Businesses with existing tax exempt bonds can consider refinancing their facilities because of unusually low interest rates. All of that is good news and has a positive impact on the business community.  It’s good for employees as well.  When a company doesn’t have to pay as much to borrow money, cash flow is better and so are wages!

Why a new organization? Does this community really need yet another one? Aren’t we trying to consolidate what we have? Blame it on the IRS.

The Internal Revenue Service will allow a certain amount of money to be loaned at a tax exempt rate. It spurs business growth which results in a broader tax base, better wages, more income tax, etc. But too much of this type of lending will create the opposite effect.

Each state, and each county within each state, is allowed to issue $10 million in bank qualified tax exempt lending. For years, this has been more than enough to fund business growth in Adams County. But because of today’s lending environment, businesses are trying to capitalize (pun intended) on the favorable interest rates by refinancing and even increasing the borrowing for additional needs that might have been planned for the future or over a period of time.

Sure, we can provide this service to whomever is first in the door or we can evaluate the projects by value to the community. Or we can do both. The Board of Commissioners asked how they could make this option available to more businesses. It was through their own research that the idea of a creating a General Authority was conceived.

The bottom line: by creating the new General Authority, Adams County businesses will have another $10 million available for tax exempt lending.

Does this mean that the County of Adams will be responsible for more debt? The IDA and GA do not commit the county or any other municipality (or their tax payers) to the debt. The Authority is the issuer, or administrator, keeping track of the lending in the County and making certain that the guidelines and policies are followed.

By expanding our lending limit, no one is required to pick winners or losers—everyone wins. A new avenue, or vehicle, increases cash flow into, and throughout the county, which is certainly a victory for all.

Robin Fitzpatrick serves as President of ACEDC and can be reached at 717-334-0042, ext. 1. For additional information, see acedc.org, and follow the organization on Facebook and Twitter for the latest Adams County business news.

 

 

Commerce Center Welcomes Steve Rice

May 2016 Steve Rice and Robin FitzpatrickWelcome and congratulations to Steve Rice, proud new owner of Lot 17 at the Adams Commerce Center. The Adams County Industrial Development Authority (ACIDA) sold this land to Attorney Rice on May 2. Today, under a beautiful blue sky, we finally had the chance to snap a publicity photo of Attorney Rice with ACEDC Executive Director Robin Fitzpatrick.

Only three lots remain for sale at the Commerce Center: Lots 10, 12, and 13. Please contact ACEDC for more details!

Map of available lots May 2016

 

Learning About LERTA and ED Tools

This column was originally published in the Gettysburg Times, May 12, 2016

By Kaycee Kemper

Our summer calendars are starting to fill up with exciting plans—many of which involve us “hitting the road” and doing some traveling. Here at ACEDC, we are “hitting the road” and traveling to some of our 34 municipalities!

We have been invited by several Adams County municipalities, to meet with local borough and municipal officials who want to spur economic development efforts in their jurisdictions. It’s a way of being proactive and open, learning about the various tools in our economic development toolbox.

One of those tools is LERTA, an acronym for the Local Economic Revitalization Tax Assistance Act. LERTA promotes economic development by providing property tax abatements for up to 10 years for improvements to industrial, commercial and business property.

A LERTA is established by ordinance of the local municipality following notice and a public hearing.  To establish such a district, the municipality must conclude that an area has “economically and socially undesirable land uses,” or other evidence of deterioration as defined in the Act.  Once established, the County and School District may elect to participate in the LERTA, but each taxing body decides the amount and duration of the property tax abatement it will provide.

We are very fortunate to rely on the guidance and knowledge of John Cox, municipal finance lawyer and partner at the firm Rhoads & Sinon, regarding LERTA and other tools such as the Tax Increment Financing Act (TIF). Cox serves as bond council for the Adams County Industrial Development Authority (ACIDA).

The last time LERTA was enacted in Adams County was to aid in the rebuilding of The Gettysburg Hotel after it was ravaged by fire in the 1980s. This landmark hotel reopened in 1991, and today it is one of Gettysburg’s crown jewels, prominently and distinctly located on Lincoln Square.

LERTA is just one of a number of economic development tools that we look forward to reviewing with local officials this summer during our visits. Additional Adams County borough and municipal officials are welcome to call and schedule visits at any time.

ACEDC’s mission is to improve the economy of Adams County while preserving and enhancing the quality of life by formulating, implementing, and promoting economic development strategies for sustained investment and employment opportunities in Adams County. Quite often, this process requires a creative approach by examining all the economic development tools at our fingertips.

We are also excited to announce two new tools, at our fingertips, within our online toolbox: ACEDC is now tweeting, so please start following us on Twitter! Our handle is @AdamsCoEDC. Also, THIS is our new blog where you can subscribe to our latest press releases and news items—look in the right-hand column and subscribe today!

Kaycee Kemper serves as Vice President of ACEDC and can be reached at 717-334-0042, ext. 2. For additional information, see acedc.org, and follow the organization on Facebook and Twitter for the latest Adams County business news.

 

 

Introducing “Authentic Adams County”

Agriculture is one of the three pillars of Adams County economy (the other pillars are Manufacturing/Industrial and Tourism). And recently we identified a number of growth industries within Adams County: Agribusiness, Biotech, Plastics and Technology.

So it was very exciting to be treated to a video preview (today!) by our partner Destination Gettysburg–because their first video in their “Authentic Adams County” series features both agriculture and agribusiness from two dynamic Adams County businesses, Rettland Farms and Fidler & Co Craft Kitchen. Enjoy!

 

 

Weikert’s Livestock Business Expands Thanks to Loan Facilitated by ACEDC

Weikert Farm

GETTYSBURG, PA (March 14, 2016) – A 4th-generation Adams County farmer and livestock producer recently added more than 100 acres of farmland to his family’s agricultural holdings thanks to a low-interest business loan facilitated through the nonprofit Adams County Economic Development Corporation (ACEDC) and funded through a mix of state resources and local bank financing.

Jeff Weikert of Weikert’s Livestock, Fairfield, says the acquisition of a 112-acre Highland Township farm will allow him to grow crops and eventually raise cattle on the property, located along Knoxlyn-Orrtanna Road. All of the cattle currently owned by Weikert’s Livestock graze on Virginia farmland; the purchase will help his family raise their signature beef cattle closer to home.

“I was raised in the (agriculture) business,” says the 31-year old Weikert, whose family business currently includes his father, uncle, and cousin. “My great-grandfather started the family business more than 50 years ago, and I hope I can pass it along to my children one day, so it’s awesome to carry on that tradition.”

Weikert’s Livestock relies on 700 acres of Adams County farmland to produce corn, soybeans, and hay; the recent purchase gives the family more than 800 acres in total. Soil quality on the new farm is good, according to Weikert, and the property’s rolling hills include a vista of the Gettysburg Battlefield and Little Round Top.

“I never thought I would have the chance to buy a farm at such a young age, so I jumped at the chance,” he continues. “I couldn’t have done it without the financing from ACEDC which gave us a crazy low interest rate.” Jeff, along with his wife Lyndsey, are

Financing was organized by ACEDC Vice President Kaycee Kemper through the state’s Pennsylvania Industrial Development Authority (PIDA), and local banker Luke Walton, M&T Bank, Gettysburg.

“ACEDC is pleased to see the next agricultural generation becoming involved and taking ownership of farmland,” states Kemper.  “We are seeing a positive trend—Adams County’s young farmers are finishing their education, then coming back home to begin their adult lives and launch amazing advances in the world of agriculture. We’re happy to be a part of that transformation, partnering with commercial lenders to make these projects possible.”

The Weikert project marks the 42nd loan facilitated by ACEDC to Adams County farmers since 1996. Previous loan projects, located throughout the entire county, supported projects that included cattle, orchards, cold storage, chickens, crop production, eggs, turkeys and wineries.

“It is eye-opening to many people, to hear the phrases ‘agricultural business’ and ‘economic development’ in the same context,” explains Robin Fitzpatrick, ACEDC President. “Our organization exists to support Adams County’s three main pillars of industry—agriculture, tourism, and manufacturing/industrial. Every county has a distinct blend of businesses comprising its economy; agriculture is a cornerstone of Adams County’s economic ‘personality.’”

ACEDC is certified annually by DCED in order to process and administer loan and grant programs for Adams County’s businesses.

ACEDC began administering loans to the agricultural and tourism industries during Governor Edward G. Rendell’s administration, 2003-2011, thanks to revised and restructured state policies.

Complete economic benchmarks achieved over the past nine years by ACEDC include:

  • More than $26.5 million in total public investment via low-interest loans and grants from DCED
  • More than $74 million in total private investment via local commercial financing
  • Jobs created in Adams County: 587
  • Jobs retained in Adams County: 1,520

ACEDC is a private, 501 (c)(6) not-for-profit organization incorporated in 1989 as a result of a task force initiated by Adams County business leaders. The corporation is governed by a board of director comprised of many local and regional community leaders from all sectors of industry. Membership is open to both individuals and businesses at a variety of levels, which not only offers member benefits, but allows ACEDC to continue its 26-year-long mission: To improve the economy of Adams County while preserving and enhancing the quality of life by formulating, implementing and promoting economic development strategies for sustained investment and employment opportunities in Adams County.

For more information, see acedc.org or call 717-334-0042.

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SUGGESTED CAPTIONS FOR ATTACHED PHOTO: ACEDC Loan Supports Agricultural Acquisition: A 112-acre Highland Township farm was recently purchased by Jeff Weikert of Fairfield’s Weikert’s Livestock, thanks to a small business loan facilitated by Adams County Economic Development Corporation (ACEDC).

MEDIA CONTACT: Karen Hendricks, Hendricks Communications, 717-253-3553

Adams County: The Keystone of a Major East Coast Digital Connection

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By Marty Qually, Adams County Commissioner

Digital infrastructure is vital to all businesses today; it is considered an essential service such as electric, water, sewer, etc. Adams County’s key location in the Mid-Atlantic corridor places us firmly in the middle of an extensive project designed to upgrade our region’s digital assets. ACEDC welcomes guest columnist Adams County Commissioner Marty Qually to explain the value of this project to Adams County. 

This article was originally published in the Gettysburg Times, March 10, 2016.

In 1999 I landed my first job by e-mail. It felt like I had entered a new professional world. By 2013, my family had three devices that connected to the internet. Now we have 17! To say that our reliance on the internet has increased dramatically in three years is stating the obvious.

Like my family, Adams County is reaching a point where our digital infrastructure needs an upgrade. Recently I received some exciting news about a regional internet company and the PA Department of Community and Economic Development (DCED), working together to help eastern and south-central PA catch up to the rest of the world.

United Fiber and Data (UFD), a York-based digital infrastructure company, is asking local business and community leaders to support plans to upgrade our digital infrastructure. UFD is in the process of running a high-capacity data line from New York City to Ashburn VA—the two largest data hubs on the east coast. These two cities have the highest concentration of IT, telecommunications, biotech, federal government, and international organization infrastructure on the east coast and are critical communication centers to Europe.

This new line running through PA will act as both an upgrade to current lines and a new level of geographic security for the entire network. What benefits could this new line bring to Adams County? Lower internet cost, improved home values, better education, new businesses, and improvements to the current business community—for starters.

Each of us pays a portion of our internet bill for a set amount of data. That data does not move from your device directly to the internet; instead it travels through a series of lines until it reaches a data hub, such as New York or Ashburn. The more lines it travels through, the more “tolls” are added by each carrier. If this new line is created it will dramatically decrease the number of lines or carriers that add fees.

Imagine trying to sell a house that’s not connected to electricity or sewer lines; your value would be much lower than the same house with these services. Likewise, houses and businesses with high-speed internet are valued higher than those without, especially for those interested in telecommuting to Baltimore or Washington, D.C.

Our economy is a digital economy. Fruit growers communicate with overseas buyers, tourism destinations use internet marketing, manufacturers are increasingly computerized. Adams County needs to keep our digital infrastructure strong and that means investigating and guiding UFD’s plans.

By the end of 2016, UFD will connect New York with Ashburn, and while the path will go through both Hanover, PA and Frederick, MD, the exact path between the two is still unknown but is sure to travel through Adams County. As a community, it is up to us to guide that path. In order to assist UFD, DCED has provided grant funds to facilitate the surveying of local businesses and residents. They are asking questions as simple as “Please describe your organization’s current use of information technology (computers, networked devices, information applications, Internet service).”

(The original article included a link to the survey here.)

For more information, check Gigabit FAQs. UFD will hold a follow-up meeting to discuss survey results at the HACC Gettysburg campus on April 21 at 1:30 pm. Thank you for considering this project and its implications for Adams County’s future.

 

 

Why economic development is important—from Peach Glen to Papua New Guinea

This column originally published in the Gettysburg Times, February 11, 2016

By Duane Kanagy, Adams Electric

Adams EC

Politician, businessman and diplomat Jon Huntsman, Jr., once claimed that he was criticized by those who say government should not be in the economic development business at all.

“My response is that the only country I know that doesn’t have an economic development plan is Papua New Guinea,” he quipped. Huntsman served as the 16th Governor of Utah and as United States Ambassador to Singapore and China and knows of where he speaks.

Papua New Guinea may still not have an economic development plan, but the point is that governments at all levels in all modern countries have a hand at building healthy economies in order to have healthy communities.

The City of San Pablo, California, lists on its website just a few of the ways in which economic development helps communities:

  • Increased Tax Base…the additional revenue provided by economic development supports, maintains, and improves local infrastructure, such as roads, parks, libraries, and emergency medical services.
  • Job Development…economic development provides better wages, benefits, and opportunities for advancement.
  • Business Retention…businesses feel appreciated by the community and, in turn, are more likely to stay in town, contributing to the economy.
  • Economic Diversification…a diversified economic base helps expand the local economy and reduces a community’s vulnerability to a single business sector.
  • Self-sufficiency…a stronger economic base means public services are less dependent on intergovernmental influences and alliances, which can change with each election.
  • Productive Use of Property…property used for its “highest and best use” maximizes the value of that property.
  • Quality of Life…more local tax dollars and jobs raise the economic tide for the entire community, including the overall standard of living of the residents.
  • Recognition of Local Products…successful economic development often occurs when locally produced goods are consumed in the local market to a greater degree.

Our economic developers include the Adams County Economic Development Corporation (ACEDC). Their role evolves continuously as they work with local government bodies and other organizations to plan, design and implement economic development strategies. They also act as a key liaison between public and private sectors and the community.

ACEDC is instrumental in helping to leverage finances from both the public and private sectors—funding that is critical to help communities attract new businesses and assist existing business with expansion and troubleshooting.

It’s the local-level economic development professionals, including the professionals at ACEDC, who can assist these businesses and help them thrive. That creates jobs and more revenue for our communities.

Adams Electric is also committed to economic development. Electric cooperatives are governed by seven guiding principles, and the seventh is “concern for community.”

Adams Electric takes that charge seriously. That is why the cooperative has a Community Development Loan Fund that assists local nonprofits expand and continue to serve their communities. That is also why we are strong supporters of ACEDC and the valuable work that organization does for us all.

So, whether you live in Peach Glen or Papua New Guinea, remember that economic development is important as a path to a better life for all.

This month’s ACEDC column is provided by Duane Kanagy, Manager of Communications/Community Services for Adams Electric, as a benefit of Adams Electric’s Presidential Investment in ACEDC for 2016. Additionally, Duane serves on ACEDC’s Board of Directors and is a valued member of several ACEDC Committees.

You are invited to partner with ACEDC as a 2016 investor to continue our county’s success. Investments by businesses, nonprofits and individuals, which include a host of benefits, are being added to the ACEDC website on a rolling basis. See the current listing at acedc.org under Investor Directory. ACEDC is grateful to Adams Electric and all 2016 investors! Contact ACEDC’s Kaycee Kemper (717-334-0042, Kemper10@acedc.org) for more information and to become an investor today.